2221

Some 2221 History

By June 13, 2020 No Comments

Connells Point NSW 2221

Connells Point is a suburb in southern Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Connells Point is 20 kilometres south of the Sydney central business district and is part of in the local government area of the Georges River Council, in the St George area.

Connells Point takes its name from the geographical formation beside Connells Bay, on the Georges River. It is a small suburb surrounded by the suburbs of Hurstville Grove and South Hurstville, Blakehurst and Kyle Bay.

Kyle Bay is a suburb in southern Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Kyle Bay is 19 kilometres south of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of the Georges River Council and is part of the St George area.

Kyle Bay takes its name from the bay that sits on the northern shore of the Georges River. It is a tiny, affluent, picturesque suburb around this bay and Harness Cask Point. Kyle Bay is surrounded by the suburbs of Blakehurst, South Hurstville and Connells Point. Kangaroo Point sits on the opposite bank of the Georges River. It is 7 km west of Botany Bay and 12 km north-west of the Cronulla surfing beaches. This leafy suburb is graced with scenic riverside parks and reserves including Merriman Reserve and Donnelly Reserve. Kyle Bay and Harness Cask Point are natural formations.

Kyle Bay was named after local shipbuilder Robert Kyle (or Coile). The land around Kyle Bay was originally granted by the Crown to Robert Kyle and James Merriman on 9 November 1853. Kyle Parade and Merriman Street are named in their honour. Legacy House is a historic estate on the eastern shore of Kyle Bay. It was bequest to children and first operated from 1948 to 1983 as a convalescent home for children. It was then taken over by Legacy as a home for the children of servicemen/women who have either lost their parents or whose parents were unable to care for them.

Blakehurst was named after William Blake, road assessor and postmaster for Cooks River in 1863. Blake ran a small farm in this area that was originally part of a land grant of 75 acres (300,000 m2) to Robert Townson in 1808.

A punt was established in 1864 at Tom Uglys Point or Punt Point. A few tales have been told about the origin of the name possibly being mispronunciation by local Aborigines of the names of two locals, Tom Huxley or Tom Woguly. However, it is now believed that it was named after an Aboriginal man from the south coast called ‘Towwaa’ or Toweiry’, who later lived and died at the point. His nickname was Tom Ugly. 

Tom Uglys Bridge was originally known as Georges River Bridge when it first opened in 1929. The second crossing at this location was opened in 1987.

The Hurstville area was granted to Captain John Townson and his brother Robert Townson in 1808; Captain Townson was granted 1,950 acres (7.9 km2) which was on the land now occupied by the suburb of Hurstville and parts of Bexley, while Robert was granted the land which is now occupied by Penshurst, Mortdale, and parts of Peakhurst. The next year, Captain Townson was granted an additional 250 acres (1.0 km2) in the area now occupied by Kingsgrove and Beverly Hills. The Townson brothers, however, were not happy with the heavily timbered land that they were given because it was not suitable for the farming of sheep for wool; consequently, it is likely that the brothers never occupied their land.

The land was sold to a wealthy merchant named Simeon Lord (1771–1840) in 1812, who called his land Lord’s Bush. When Simeon Lord died, the land became the property of John Rose Holden and James Holt of the Bank of N.S.W.

The land was sold to Michael Gannon (1800–61) in 1850 and became known as Gannon’s Forest. The Gannon’s Forest post office opened in 1881. The local school was known as Hurstville by School Inspector MacIntyre in 1876. When the railway arrived in 1884, the station took the name “Hurstville” from the school. Hurstville municipality was incorporated in 1887.

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